2Oceansvibe Doesn’t Like To Be Told…

Earlier last week, it was brought to my attention that 2oceansvibe had used a comment I left on their website as the basis of an editorial they wrote about the radio industry. While I have no issue with this, I do have an issue with some of the content in my comment possibly being misleading in the context of the article.

So, here is my response to the article.

Firstly, the comment I made in the context of the original article was a criticism of the radio industry in general and not Primedia Broadcasting alone. To represent that comment as anything else such is misleading given the context of the article in question.

Secondly, I was employed by Primedia Broadcasting and not Kfm as the article may lead some to believe. Further, in my original comment on the original article, I had not identified myself as a Primedia Broadcasting employee (ex or otherwise), nor had I mentioned Primedia Broadcasting in any way. Instead, I chose to comment in my private capacity. For the record, I resigned from Primedia around 5 years ago. So the headline is patently sensationalist. Moreover, the comment is based on my own opinion and should not be attributed to any of my colleagues from Primedia Broadcasting.

Finally, and most importantly, while 2oceansvibe may use the comment to strengthen their argument for digital radio vs traditional radio, my comment in no way should be viewed as an endorsement in favour of 2oceansvibe or any of its subsidiary or associated brands or activities. In my opinion, there’s very little in terms of content to separate the 2oceansvibe from its terrestrial counterparts.

Nonetheless, I stand by my comment as a criticism of the industry and still believe digital radio is the future of the medium.

On a personal note, while I can respect the editorial privilege that Seth enjoys on his site, I find it rather disappointing that he chose to delete my comment instead of responding to it directly on his site or to me via email. Doing so is disingenuos and can only be viewed as a self-serving act of someone who doesn’t really want to engage in any meaningful debate around the topic. 

UPDATE: Almost immediately after posting this piece, Seth contacted me (see below) to let me know the comment had reappeared. Something about cache issues  – although I was contacted via Twitter and was told it had something to do with manually approving comments. Regardless, I will take him at his word regarding that and retract the final statements of this post.

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The Bill Of Responsibilities…

The new site has been keeping me busy so I haven’t been blogging as I should. In fact, I wasn’t going to blog at all until the new site was up and running but then…then this came along…

LEADSA announces the Bill Of Responsibilities.

Yeah. I know…

This Bill Of Responsibilities (pasted below this article) is probably the biggest load of shite I’ve read in ages.

Supposedly, the 12 responsibilities flow from the 12 Constitutional Rights of all citizens of South Africa, but from what I’ve read in the document, they only flow from the right to equality. Speaking of reading, the BOR reads like it was written by a dyslexic 16 year old with a short attention span. Most of it isn’t even coherent. Of course, that might just be acceptable for the Department of Basic Education (who supported this bill).

Let’s take a closer look at some of the items.

According to this document I have to discharge the responsibility of “recognising that love means long-term commitment”. Moreover, I must also take on the “responsibility to establish strong and loving families”. Really? So single or divorced parents are irresponsible and have failed the rest of us…assuming “us” represents we who have signed up for this shite.

Now there may be those of you who will try defend this hogwash on the grounds of intent and semantics… Right. Let’s consider intent and semantics, both of which affect the meaning of a document. That’s why the rights within the Constitution weren’t written up during a lunch-break. Due consideration must be given to the language used so as to leave no room for misinterpretation of the document or for misunderstanding as to the intent of the document.

In this case, the intent of the document is unclear and the language use is poor. Seriously, when did electricity become a resource? Further, how does living in a safe environment become a personal responsibility? Also, how does “greeting warmly” become an issue of national importance?

This bill is a waste of time – and of no use to any bugger, not even the middle-class privileged minority for whom it was written, seeing as they are the only ones who have the time or inclination to pay this any mind. It’s nothing more than a cheap publicity stunt and will make no material difference in the life of anyone enjoying even the merest acquaintance with reality.

And here’s the link to the BOR just so you know the dunce-cap style language use below is not my own doing. Seriously, thinking that far down would just be too painful.

FULL DISCLOSURE: A long time ago, I used to work for Primedia. It was fun. I resigned. There are still some really great folks there. If you visit, tell them I say “Hey”.

Call to Action

These 12 responsibilities flow from each of the 12 rights enshrined in the
Constitution of the Republic of South Africa

My responsibility in ensuring the right to
The right to equality places on me the
responsibility to:
equality
• not to discriminate unfairly against anyone
• on the basis of race, gender, sex, pregnancy,
marital status, ethnic or social origin,
colour, sexual orientation, age, disability,
religion, conscience, belief, culture, class,
language or birth.
My responsibility in ensuring the right to
The right to equality places on me the
responsibility to:
human dignity
The right to human dignity places on me
the responsibility to:
• treat people with reverence, respect and dignity
• be kind, compassionate and sensitive to every
human being, including greeting them warmly and
speaking to them courteously
My responsibility in ensuring the right to
The right to equality places on me the
responsibility to:
life
The right to life places on me the
responsibility to:
• protect and defend the lives of others
• not endanger the lives of others by carrying
dangerous weapons or by acting recklessly or
disobeying our rules and laws
• live a healthy life, by exercising, eating correctly, by
not smoking, abusing alcohol, or taking drugs, or
indulging in irresponsible behaviour that may result in
my being infected or infecting others with
communicable diseases such as HIV and AIDS
My responsibility in ensuring the right to
The right to equality places on me the
responsibility to:
family or parental care
This right expects me to:
• honour and respect my parents, and to help them,
• be kind and loyal to my family, to my brothers and
sisters, my grandparents and all my relatives
• recognise that love means long-term commitment,
and the responsibility to establish strong and loving
families
My responsibility in ensuring the right to
The right to equality places on me the
responsibility to:
education
The right to education places on me the
responsibility to:
• attend school regularly, to learn, and to work hard
• cooperate respectfully with teachers and fellow
learners and
• adhere to the rules and the Code of Conduct of the
school and concurrently places on my parents and
caregivers the responsibility to:
• ensure that I attend school and receive their support
and places on my teachers the
responsibility to:
• promote and reflect the culture of learning and
teaching in giving effect to this right.
My responsibility in ensuring the right to
The right to equality places on me the
responsibility to:
work
This right carries with it the responsibility
for all learners, parents, caregivers and
teachers to:
• work hard and do our best in everything we do
• recognise that living a good and successful life
involves hard work, and that anything worthwhile only
comes with effort
• know that this right must never be used to expose
children to child labour
(proposed alternative: prevent children being exposed
to child labour)
My responsibility in ensuring the right to
The right to equality places on me the
responsibility to:
freedom & security
of the person
The right is upheld by my taking
responsibility for:
• not hurting, bullying, or intimidating others, or
allowing others to do so; and
• solving any conflict in a peaceful manner
My responsibility in ensuring the right to
The right to equality places on me the
responsibility to:
own property
The right to own property places on me
the responsibility to:
• respect the property of others
• take pride in and protect both private and public
property, and not to take what belongs to others
• be honest and fair, and for those who have, to give
generously to charity and good causes
My responsibility in ensuring the right to
The right to equality places on me the
responsibility to:
freedom of religion, belief
and opinion
The right to freedom of conscience
requires me to:
• allow others to choose and practice the religion of
their choice, and to hold their own beliefs and opinions,
without fear or prejudice
• respect the beliefs and opinions of others, and their
right to express these, even when we may strongly
disagree with these beliefs and opinions. That is what
it means to be a free democracy
My responsibility in ensuring the right to
The right to equality places on me the
responsibility to:
live in a safe
environment
This right assumes the responsibility to:
• promote sustainable development, and the
conservation and preservation of the natural
environment.
• protect animal and plant-life, as well as the
responsibility to prevent pollution, to not litter, and to
ensure that our homes, schools, streets and other
public places are kept neat and tidy
• in the context of climate change, we are also obliged
to ensure we do not waste scarce resources like water
and electricity
My responsibility in ensuring the right to
The right to equality places on me the
responsibility to:
citizenship
The right to citizenship expects that each
of us will be good and loyal South
African citizens. This means that we are
responsible for:
• obeying the laws of our country
• ensuring that others do so as well, and
• contributing in every possible way to making South
Africa a great country
My responsibility in ensuring the right to
The right to equality places on me the
responsibility to:
freedom of expression
The right to free expression is not
unlimited, and does not allow us to:
• express views which advocate hatred, or are based
on prejudices with regard to race, ethnicity, gender or
religion
• we must therefore take responsibility to ensure this
right is not abused by ourselves or others, to not tell or
spread lies, and to ensure others are not insulted or
have their feelings hurt

Glossary

enshrined to cherish as sacred

dignity bearing, conduct, or speech indicative of self-respect or appreciation of the formality or gravity
of an occasion or situation

equality the state or quality of being equal; correspondence in quantity, degree, value, rank, or ability

freedom the state of being free or at liberty rather than in confinement

implicit implied, rather than expressly stated: implicit agreement, unquestioning or unreserved;
absolute responsibility, reliability or dependability

imbued to impregnate or inspire, as with feelings, opinions

ubuntu human heartedness, social and spiritual philosophy, serving as a framework for African
society

inclusivity embracing of everybody

respect deference to a right, privilege, privileged position, or someone or something considered to
have certain rights or privileges; proper acceptance or courtesy; acknowledgment

dialogue an exchange of ideas or opinions on a particular issue, esp.a political or religious issue, with
a view to reaching an amicable agreement or settlement

precondition something that must come before or is necessary to a subsequent result; condition

communication the imparting or interchange of thoughts, opinions, or information by speech, writing,
or signs

productivity having the power of producing; generative; creative